Care for the Caregiver

Caregiving is one of the most socially important roles we can provide for others. Over the course of our lifetime, we will likely move through a variety of caregiving roles, from parenting small children to providing support to an ailing spouse. As we age, the people we love will age, too. For many of us, the strength of our caregiving capacities will be challenged by our own physical and mental limitations.

As an acupuncturist specializing in treating elders and caregivers, I am here to help.

In my work with elders, I am reminded every day of the need for skilled, compassionate caregivers in aging services. We live in a time when children often live far away from their parents, complicating the ability to provide one-on-one care. For some older adults, the network of caregivers they can rely on is very thin—considerate friends or sometimes only paid employees. Aging can create unforeseen vulnerabilities, such as dementia or compromised mobility, situations that require the kindness of a caregiver’s patient support and watchful eye.

Because of the challenges of aging, the difficulties for caregivers can be immense. Primary caregivers, or care partners, as some prefer to be called, shoulder physical, mental, and spiritual worries that often go unshared. In a caregiving relationship, the person with fewer hindrances may feel unable to complain, vent, cry, or express anger about their position. After all, they may think, I’m not the one with Parkinson’s. Or, Who else will take care of all of the work if I don’t?

The pressure to be super-human can take its toll on even the most resourceful caregiver.

At Boulder Acupuncture and Herbs, I am focused on elder health. Implicit in that vision is a commitment to the wellbeing of caregivers, too. After all, without a vital caregiving community, how can we provide the necessary help elders need to stay safe, healthy, active, and engaged through their senior years? Caregivers are a critical piece of this social puzzle.

Unfortunately, caregivers are at a greater risk of developing depression, physical burnout, and long-term health issues. The impacts of extensive caregiving are becoming much more publicized, as shown by the Family Caregiver Alliance of San Francisco, California. According to FCA, the choice to place a family member in a long-term care facility is usually linked to the caregiver’s health, not necessarily the elder’s health. This means we have a lot to do, as a community, to keep our caregivers, and our seniors, well.

What, then, can acupuncture do to help care for the caregiver? So much.

Here are 7 ways acupuncture can benefit caregivers:

  1. Your job is physically demanding. Acupuncture is proven to relieve pain.
  2. You go home tired but still can’t sleep. Acupuncture treats insomnia.
  3. You eat on the run. Acupuncture optimizes digestion.
  4. You work with many people, every day. Acupuncture boosts your immunity.
  5. You help others age well. Acupuncture keeps you active.
  6. You are human. Acupuncture reduces stress, anxiety & depression.
  7. You care for everyone else. Your acupuncturist is your ally in health.

Caregivers need to be reminded that their wellbeing is as important as that of their care partner’s. By shifting the conversation on caregiving toward the needs of caregivers, we build strength, resiliency, and compassion into our community. This leads to a win-win for elders and the people who care for them every day.

If you are doing the super-human work of caregiving, please reach out for a little support. The Boulder County Area Agency on Aging has many resources for caregivers, including respite care, classes, a lending library, and so much more. Boulder Acupuncture and Herbs is here for you, too.

Most of all, thank you for all that you do.