Acupuncture for Hot Flashes

hot flash

Now that it’s summer in Boulder, let’s talk about those overwhelming hot flashes you’ve been having and how acupuncture and Chinese herbs can help.

Many women suffer from hot flashes related to menopause. For some women, these temperature fluctuations let up quickly after menstruation officially stops. Other women live with hot flashes and night sweats for years after menopause. This condition is, in many cases, treatable with Chinese medicine.

Unfortunately, Western medication for hot flashes is often anti-depressants. Since many patients don’t want to be on mood-altering medications, women are left with few options for managing this uncomfortable symptom. Acupuncture and Chinese herbs, on the other hand, really work to cool you down, regulate your hormones, and help you sleep. In fact, Chinese medicine has been used to help women through menopause for centuries.

Let’s look at what a course of treatment could include.

Warm, Hot, or Raging?

Hot flashes—and their nighttime counterpart, night sweats—usually begin as mild episodes of discomfort in perimenopause. During this time, the period becomes irregular. Blood flow may change, and you may experience a shift in frequency, duration of your period, or premenstrual symptoms. The perimenopausal transition can last for a number of years, and hot flashes and night sweats may start well before a woman is officially in menopause.

Menopause occurs once a woman has naturally gone six months without having a period or has had her ovaries removed. This hormonal shift can instigate stronger hot flashes and night sweating, although all women are different. For some women, hot flashes are never a problem; others report living with this condition for years after menopause.

The first question I ask hot flash sufferers is how frequently their episodes occur. Once a day? Twelve times a day? Only at night…but all night? Frequency is important to determine, as it will help us chart whether your treatment is working.

Next I want to know how hot a patient feels. Just uncomfortably warm? Briefly hot, but then chilled to the bone? Or are you soaking your sheets at night? Severity of the episodes is also an important point. This will steer me toward whether I recommend acupuncture, Chinese herbs, or both.

Finally, how long a patient has suffered from hot flashes is critical. Is it a new symptom, or have you had them for years? Typically, newer symptoms are easier to treat, whereas older problems take more time to unravel.

Acupuncture, Herbs, or Both?

Patients with mild hot flashes—often women in perimenopause—can usually expect great results with acupuncture alone. I recommend weekly treatments with sessions spaced further apart once symptoms significantly diminish. During that time I will have you track how often you have hot flashes and their severity.

If your hot flashes and night sweats are not managed by acupuncture alone, we should consider a customized Chinese herbal formula. Taking Chinese herbs every day is like getting a daily treatment. For women with strong symptoms, or for those who don’t want acupuncture, herbs are a promising solution.

Finally, some patients benefit most by using both acupuncture and herbs. Women who have had hot flashes a long time, or who have hot flashes with a complex overall health picture, should consider using both.

In all cases, the most important thing to remember is this: come in early. The longer the problem lingers, the harder it can be to treat. That being said, even if you’ve had symptoms for years, Chinese medicine may really be able to help. Most patients can expect changes in the first few sessions.

As one patient shared, “…following just a few treatments with Norah, my hot flashes are now what I would consider ‘micro-flashes’ and are few and far between.” (For more details see Testimonials.)

If hot flashes and night sweats are causing you to dread the summer months in Boulder, call us today to talk about acupuncture and herbal treatment options.

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