How Does Acupuncture Work? Part II

acupuncture meridiansIn Part I of How Does Acupuncture Work? we discovered how qi, blood, yin, and yang interact. Let’s take a deeper look at the way these forces merge to create the major organs of the body.

The Organs in Chinese Medicine

The primary organs in Chinese medicine include the Liver, Heart, Spleen, Lungs, and Kidneys. Each of these organs has a “sphere of influence,” meaning it impacts the function of other aspects of the body and can offer diagnostic clues leading to treatment possibilities based on deep-seated relationships.

Here are a few examples of internal imbalances leading to external signs and symptoms:

The Liver impacts the eyes in Chinese medicine. Virtually all eye symptoms can be traced back to Liver disharmonies. This may sound absurd in Western medicine, but we know that by treating the Liver in Chinese medicine, we can impact eye health.

The same is true for the Lungs. In Chinese medicine, the Lungs are responsible for the skin. Unlike the example of the Liver, the relationship between lung health and skin health is well-documented in allopathic medicine. For example, we know patients with asthma and allergies are more likely to develop eczema.

Through questioning patients about subjective symptoms, the acupuncturist is able to work backward to diagnose imbalances deeper in the body.

Investigating in this way yields many clinical benefits. For one, acupuncturists pay attention to signs and symptoms that may be overlooked by other practitioners. In fact, many acupuncture patients are surprised by the specificity of our diagnostic approach. We often ask questions other healthcare practitioners do not ask.

The next time your acupuncturist rattles off a list of strange questions, know they are gathering important information that will result in a customized treatment strategy designed specifically for your condition.

The relationship between all these disparate signs and symptoms can be confusing to Western patients. But rest assured, it’s the acupuncturist’s job to discover these relationships, not yours.

 

Seeing the Bigger Picture

Acupuncturists also gather objective information on a patient’s health by examining the body.

One of the primary ways we get information about what is happening internally is by feeling the radial pulse in your wrists.

Each wrist offers a window into your internal environment. I feel the pulse bilaterally at a superficial level and deeper, closer to the bone. This technique tells me about the state of each of the organ systems mentioned above, as well as the vitality of qi, blood, yin, and yang.

Acupuncturists also investigate the tongue. Believe it or not, your tongue tells a story about your inner climate. Do you run hot or cold? Do you have phlegm in your intestines or lungs? The tongue will often reveal these conditions. (If you are curious about tongue diagnosis, check out Why Does My Acupuncturist Look at My Tongue?)

We also physically examine the body. We may feel for changes in skin texture, how pain responds to pressure, or if the area is hot or cold. All of these signs and symptoms give us clues to what is happening internally. Once we decide on a diagnosis, we treat these imbalances by influencing the meridian system.

 

Qi and the Meridians

In Chinese medicine the human body is a connected system of relationships. Electrical and metabolic information is sent through the body via a network of invisible channels called meridians.

Meridians connect all parts of the body in a continuous network of impulses. This is why we can insert an acupuncture needle in the foot to affect the hip or one in the hand to halt sneezing. In fact, qi moving through the meridian system is the real “secret” to how acupuncture works. It is how information is conveyed.

When this system of communication is disrupted or blocked, we experience pain and dysfunction. Also, when the body is weak, the signals being sent through the meridians become weak. Acupuncture revives this signal by stimulating the qi and blood. It also directs the qi to correct the flow of these impulses so that the body functions in a healthy way.

Without the meridian system, and the theories of qi, blood, yin, yang, and the organs, there would be no Chinese medicine as we know it. If we ignore the idea of qi, throw out the theory of the organs, and simply stick a needle in a muscle, we will not be able to address truly complex health issues. Patients may experience temporary pain relief, and even a sense of relaxation, but to unravel deeper problems, such as asthma and heart arrhythmias, the ancient Chinese theories are indispensable.

As an acupuncturist and an acupuncture patient, the theoretical scaffolding beneath acupuncture has always made sense to me. It is what differentiates it from practices like dry needling or trigger point therapy, techniques that employ acupuncture needles but abandon Chinese medical theory.

As acupuncture treatment evolves in the United States, it is important that we not forget the importance of balancing qi, blood, yin, and yang, which are the basis of health. Acupuncture helps thousands of people every day all across the world because of its foundational theories, not in spite of them. Ancient Chinese doctors understood this.

We are lucky to have inherited such a profound vision of human health, one that is both applicable to modern illness and flexible enough to accommodate new knowledge. Even as we seek to explain how acupuncture works in contemporary language, we can appreciate its roots in the dynamic balance between yin and yang.

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