Acupuncture for Alzheimer’s and Dementia

senior in hat

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia impact over 5 million people in the United States. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, nearly 70,000 people in Colorado live with memory loss. With Alzheimer’s and dementia on the rise, complementary care options are critical for helping manage this widespread health crisis. Acupuncture can be an effective part of treating the many symptoms that occur with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

Alzheimer’s is a difficult condition to treat. Like many complex diseases, the causes are not well understood. Western medical intervention can help patients manage certain symptoms, but conventional treatment options have been ineffective in halting the progression of the disease. Given the increasing number of patients diagnosed with this illness, and the growth of our aging population, pharmaceutical companies and research institutions are scrambling to find a cure for this devastating disease.

Alzheimer’s and dementia primarily affect people over 65, though early-onset dementia does occur. There are currently 5.5 million people living with Alzheimer’s or dementia in the United States, and that number is expected to rise as our population ages. The widespread prevalence of these conditions has shot up dramatically over the last 17 years; since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have gone up 89%. Alzheimer’s is now the sixth leading cause of death in Colorado and the United States as a whole.

The course of cognitive diseases like these can be long. Some patients live a decade with progressively complicating symptoms. There are currently no known cures or preventative methods to stop Alzheimer’s disease. This means the full burden of the disease usually comes in old age when one’s health may already be compromised. It is not uncommon for older adults living with Alzheimer’s or dementia to have diabetes, heart disease, or other chronic illnesses.

Even in elders who do not exhibit memory loss, old age brings a host of physical and mental difficulties. Acupuncture excels in treating many conditions that show up in our later years, including arthritis, digestive issues, insomnia, hypertension, depression, and anxiety. It is important to remember that although Alzheimer’s and dementia are memory disorders, patients may suffer from physical illnesses that are manageable through complementary medicine, such as massage and acupuncture.

We know that the personality changes that accompany dementia can be challenging, both for patients and caregivers. Recent research in the U.S. on the efficacy of acupuncture in treating depression and anxiety in Alzheimer’s patients has been promising. These diseases can instigate profound feelings of despair and cause an increase in social isolation. Acupuncture, different from talk therapy, offers a body-mind treatment that can calm feelings of anxiety and lift the mood. Treatment offers patients the chance to interact with someone outside their normal sphere of care, which can stimulate social connection.

Acupuncture also excels in treating pain of all kinds. Many seniors report living with pain, which can lead to a decrease in physical activity and changes in sleep patterns. Movement is critical for maintaining health and inspiring participation in activities that bring us joy. Many dementia patients are still capable of physical exercise and should be encouraged to stay active as a way of promoting their overall health. Acupuncture keeps seniors moving by alleviating back, knee, neck, and foot pain.

Expanded research on using acupuncture and Chinese herbs in treating Alzheimer’s is being explored in China and Japan where prevalence of the disease is also on the rise. While we cannot claim that East Asian medicine currently offers a strong method for halting or reversing this disease, we can provide supportive care in the realm of helping to manage co-existing symptoms. Hopefully, as research on Alzheimer’s and dementia increases, comprehensive approaches to treatment will become available to patients at all stages of the disease. Ideally, we will discover ways of preventing these conditions as well.

At Boulder Acupuncture and Herbs, we treat patients in the early and middle stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia. We use both acupuncture and Shiatsu to help manage pain, depression, fatigue, and anxiety in patients with cognitive disorders. Our approach to each patient is dependent on the client’s comfort level, receptivity, and physical condition. Some patients may be seen privately, while others need a care partner present. We can also visit patients in their homes or in memory care facilities in Boulder.

The challenges of living with dementia can be overwhelming for many patients, especially during the early stages of the disease when rapidly changing capabilities can cause intense distress. Similarly, caring for a loved one diagnosed with dementia is also incredibly challenging. Managing this disease is a group effort, and we want to be of service. Call us to discuss how acupuncture might help ease the discomfort of living with dementia.

2 Comments

  1. We were recently told that my grandmother has Alzheimer’s. We have been looking at different treatments that can be used to help her with her memory. I never knew that acupuncture can help increase comprehension and reverse the disease. I’ll be sure to discuss this option with my family.

    • admiNWD

      Thanks so much for reading my post on Alzheimer’s and acupuncture. I am so hopeful it helps your grandmother. Just to be clear, acupuncture cannot reverse the course of the disease, but it can improve quality of life for people living with Alzheimer’s.

Comments are closed.